The Page

Your Page 9 correspondent was in Edmonton recently, and with some time to kill in the Cloverdale neighbourhood, decided to seek out the so-called ‘accidental’ beach that is being talked about so much. What was all the fuss about? we wondered. It’s a couple hundred yards of sand and silt (and a bit of mud) exposed by the dropping water of the North Saskatchewan River. Nothing much to get excited about, but quite a few people were out there and apparently enjoying themselves. The view of the downtown skyline is nice.
Conclusion: it’s not going to put Devonshire Beach out of business any time soon. Let’s face it: we’re spoiled by our beautiful sandy beach. We complain about it not being better, but it’s still got just about everything else beat.
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Hopefully many of you readers enjoyed The Leader’s summer gardening series because we enjoyed taking the pictures and getting to know local gardeners. We figured that a one-time (or two) harvest edition would be a good idea – so if you or someone you know would like a fruit or vegetable that they are proud of featured, give us a shout 780-849-4380.
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A former local politician was talking last week about the polarization in national and provincial politics and worrying that it is, or will, trickle down and infect the municipal scene. His view: there are good points in every party and place on the political spectrum. The thing to do is talk things over, try to see things from the other guy’s point of view and be prepared to compromise. If the best you can do is take a hard line, stick to your guns and not give your opponent the benefit of the doubt, you are likely only going to make things worse.
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We were all riveted by pictures of Hurricane Irma’s truly freakish winds. One stands out in particular: some poor guy taking shelter behind a truck, only to have the wind blow the truck over on him. We hope he’s okay, but can’t see how he could be.
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We’ve been mostly holding off on municipal election coverage, waiting for the nomination deadline. The two exceptions were interviews with reeve Kerik of the M.D. and mayor Warman of Slave Lake. Those guys set the tone by announcing their intentions fairly early. Everyone else? We thought we’d wait until Sept. 18 when candidacy becomes official. That was this past Monday, and by the time you read this, we will be busy setting up interviews with those who filed their nomination papers on that day. We hope – as always – to bring you feature articles on every one of the candidates for both councils.
Meanwhile, we notice Linda Cox is running for mayor again in High Prairie. An article by Chris Clegg in last week’s South Peace News also indicated most town councillors are expected to run again. So is every one of the incumbents on the County of Big Lakes council, according to a story in the same newspaper by Richard Froese. Meanwhile, we heard first-hand last week from Faust resident (and Town of Slave Lake employee) Christopher Brown that he plans to run for councillor against incumbent Robert Nygaard.
“He only won by 10 votes last time,” Brown says.
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It’s a good thing folks at the M.D of Lesser Slave River aren’t superstitious, or they might read all kinds of gloomy things into the scenario at the Poplar Lane pavement project ribbon-cutting ceremony last week. In short, it got rained on. And not just any rain; a few hundred metres up the road the sun was shining. It was a very specific downpour, as if intended just for the people standing out for ribbon-snipping duties – not to mention those taking pictures of them. Other than that, it was great!
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Sometimes life just kicks you in the teeth. But you already knew that. The thing to do is move on and make the best of it. And that’s about all we have to say about that.

 

 

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