The Page

Various friends of Page 9 have been driving here and there around Alberta, B.C. and Saskatchewan (or further) in recent weeks and we’ve been hearing stories. Usually they begin with gas prices, move on to hotel prices (outrageous anywhere near Jasper). Most also include tales of driving through heavy smoke, and of wet, cold weather upsetting plans for outdoor activities.
On the other hand, we heard stories of beautiful scenery in northern B.C., of recent dinosaur discoveries on display at the Tyrell Museum and of impressive agricultural landscapes around LaCrete. And more.
* * * * *
Speaking of the weather, there was a touch of frost in Slave Lake on the morning of Sept. 2, but as far as we know it wasn’t enough to damage anybody’s tomatoes. Then on the night of Sept. 4/5 it got heavier, but still wasn’t a killer.
* * * * *
Badabing, badaboom, …. bibimbap? Another tale from the road – eating a dish with that name (or something like it) at a Korean restaurant in Three Hills Alberta. Nice food! The thing about Three Hills: where the heck are those hills? Too smoky to see anything at first. Later, three modest bumps appeared in a farmer’s field north of the town. That must be them!
* * * * *
Then there’s Crossfield, where a search for a nice restaurant at lunchtime turned up a decent little joint just off the main drag in downtown. The interesting thing was that when asked for dining recommendations, the attendant at the public library didn’t mention the one that was right around the corner. When told this, the owner said, ‘She doesn’t like us.’
Oh dear. Small town stuff. No figuring that out.
* * * * *
Then there’s the talkative potter in East Coulee, who had so much to say about the history of the valley that it was hard to get a question in about the wares on display. It turns out the river (Red Deer) in that area is full of bits of bison skeleton, due to one or more buffalo jumps being in use, probably over many centuries.
* * * * *
Meanwhile, back at home, it was cool and windy on the Labour Day long weekend, but that didn’t stop some young folks from swimming in the lake – probably just to prove they could do it. It’s hard to imagine anybody enjoying such a thing, but there’s always somebody willing to give it a try. Mid-winter swimming through a hole in the ice, though – that’s something you only see on TV. But it’s probably only a matter of time before somebody pops up with a ‘polar bear’ swim project in Lesser Slave Lake. Let us know; we’ll be happy to participate – and by that we mean take pictures of it.
* * * * *
Thanks to all who participated in this year’s ‘garden feature’ series in The Leader. We didn’t get to all the ones recommended, but the good news is they will probably be blooming again in 2019 and chances are good we’ll get back at it.
* * * * *
So who did we run into at the Royal Tyrell Museum near Drumheller? Mary Brown of Slave Lake, with her daughter and great-grandson. Mary’s comment on the museum experience: ‘A lot of kids in there!’
* * * * *
Here’s the riddle that stumped all of The Leader staff last week: There were 30 cows in a field and 28 chickens. How many didn’t? It turns out it’s even more misleading written than spoken. Sorry about that.
The pun is along the same lines as the one about the ‘Focus Ranch.’ You know – the place where the sons raise meat.
Our view on the matter. The pun would be better if cows actually ate chickens.
* * * * *
The MADD chapter of Slave Lake and area is looking for someone to take on the role of community leader for the program. This is the group once known as ‘Mothers Against Drunk Driving,’ which works all over the country to raise awareness of the deadly consequences of doing that. In a MADD news release last week, the organization called drunk driving a “deadly and persistent problem in Canada,” and had figures to back it up. On average, the release says, between 1,250 and 1,500 lives are lost each year in Canada, along with 64,000 injuries.
Contact Tracy Crawford by email or phone (1-877-676-6233).
* * * * *
Hey, if you like stories about trail rides, trappers and general bush stuff before trains, planes and automobiles took over, a great read is ‘Bannock and Beans,’ by Bob White (of the Cypress Hills), who was a horse wrangler on the famous Bedaux Expedition in the 1930s.

Share this post

Post Comment