Q & A for three Stand Up Guys

As you know, local pizza guy and occasional funnyman Moe Mouallem is bringing in a couple of professional stand-up comics for an April 28 show at the Legacy Centre in Slave Lake. He opens the show; the other funny men are Sean Lecomber and He Fangzhou. We managed to track all three of them down last week with a list of questions.

He Fangzhou

Q: How did you get into stand-up comedy?

HF: There is no comedian from China in the country which is a very unique opportunity for me.

Q: What’s the best thing about it?

HF: I get to experience great things that most people don’t for examples hitch hiking and couch surfing. I can really feel the real human kindness, trust and connection. Making people laugh makes me feel more valuable.

Q: What’s the worst thing about it?

HF: I get to experience “bad” things that most people don’t for examples being homeless and being heckled.

Q: What’s the most memorable place you’ve performed and why?

HF: My hometown Anyang. I used to do Chinese traditional comedy at local festival which usually has two comedians on stage at the same time. It’s a completely different style and you get to perform in front of a big crowd.

Q: Had you ever heard of Slave Lake before Moe hired you to play here? What did you know about it?

HF: I have not, and Slave Lake will for sure be added to the interesting places I have been to in Canada. I heard about it when I met Moe. I would always love to visit the place where my great friend lives.

Q: Recommend another stand-up comic.

HF: Mark Henry Rowswell is a superstar in China. Nobody can ever be more famous than him in China and nobody in Canada knows who he is. He is from Ottawa. He does all his comedy act in perfect Mandarin.

Moe Mouallem

Q: How did you get into stand-up comedy?

MM: It was my birthday last year, and I always wanted to try it, so I (saw) a local show advertised and asked the owner if he needed an opener. They said sure and paid me in chicken wings.

Q: What’s the best thing about it?

MM: I get to stand on stage with a microphone and tell hundreds of people all my problems and insecurities. The money I save on therapists alone is worth it.

Q: What’s the worst thing about it?

MM: For me, the worst part is not being able to perform as often as I’d like. As a comic, the only way to improve is through experience and repetition.

Q: What’s the most memorable place you’ve performed and why?

MM: Comic Strip in Edmonton. It was one of my first shows, it was part of an annual competition they run, and the owner pulled me aside after the show. He was very impressed with me, and couldn’t believe that I had only been on stage a couple of times.

Q: Tell us one thing about yourself that might surprise us.

MM: I recorded a rap album and have music videos floating around the Internet.

Q: Recommend another stand-up comic.

MM: I really enjoy John Mulaney. Closer to home, Adam Blank and Brad Semotiuk never disappoint. If you’re ever in Edmonton, check them out.

Sean Lecomber

Q: How did you get into stand-up?

SL: I went out to support my brother-in-law and attended some of his shows and was drawn into it after watching a few shows.

Q: What’s the best thing about it?

SL: Travelling across the country and meeting new people and seeing the country

Q: What’s the worst thing about it?

SL: Being away from friends and family for extended periods of time.

Q: Most memorable place?

SL: Performing in England was memorable because it introduced me to a different style of comedy and completely different taste in stand up.

Q: Had you heard about Slave Lake?

SL: Oh yes. It’s a tourist destination don’t you know? I’ve been to Slave Lake a few times to do shows and always enjoyed the people. Very friendly community.

SL: Surprise us?
I have social anxiety so I’m uncomfortable being in large groups of people, so it’s kind of ridiculous I chose stand up as a profession.

Q: Recommend?

SL: Bill Burr is outstanding and as far as Canadians you should check out Mark Forward.

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